CDTA logo

CDTA Winter Traveling and Weather Tips

Back To Archived News

Weather Traveling Tips And policies

Weather Tips

When the weather turns bad, many people ride CDTA so they don't have to worry about driving. If you plan to take CDTA during a snow/ice storm, here's what you need to know:

Safety comes first
CDTA operators are trained to handle adverse weather conditions.

Some bus lines may be Rerouted
If a route has steep hills or other potential dangers, service may be rerouted until the roads have been cleared. Visit the service alerts page at cdta.org or call (518) 482-8822 to check whether your bus line is on a reroute. You can also watch for announcements on local TV and radio stations.


 

Buses may not be running on schedule
Snow and ice on the roads affects all traffic, so buses may experience delays during weather emergencies. However, buses should still arrive at regular intervals.

Preparation pays off
CDTA Supervisors will be at major transit transfer points throughout the region to assist riders. Here's how you can make your own preparations:

  • Wear high-visibility clothing.
  • Look for bus stops on clear, level streets.
  • Give yourself extra time to reach your destination. Detours and road conditions are likely to delay your trip, but we're working to get you there safely.
  • Wait until the bus comes to a complete stop and the doors open before stepping off the curb.
  • Use handrails when getting on and off the us . Remember, stairs and aisles may be slippery from the snow.
  • Hold on when riding on the bus. Buses may stop and start suddenly in wintery conditions.
  • It takes longer to stop in snow and ice, so give your driver extra notice when you signal to get off the bus.
  • Dress warmly and expect delays.
  • If there's no traffic going by your bus stop, walk to a stop on a sanded, busy street.
  • If your stop is in the middle of a hill, walk to the bottom where the bus can safely stop.
  • Stand back from the curb until the bus comes to a complete stop; it can slide sideways in slippery conditions.


Where do I find the very latest information?
Check the website Service Alerts page or call our Hotline at (518) 482-8822 and a Customer Services Representative will give you the latest update.



I live too far from the nearest bus stop to walk. Where can I park my car?
Check our Park and Ride Lot page to see if there's a lot near your route.


NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WINTER STORM ADVISORY DEFINITIONS
 

Winter Storm Watch
Issued by local National Weather Service Forecast offices when severe winter conditions including a seven inch or greater snowfall and/or significant icing of 1/2" or more, and/or significant sleet are POSSIBLE within 12 to 36 hours. Winter storm watches are issued for counties and are your first alert to the potential of a major winter storm.

Winter Storm Warning
Issued by local National Weather Service Forecast offices for individual counties when severe winter conditions are EXPECTED. Winter Storm warnings cover snow storms that are expected to drop a seven inch or greater snowfall or a combination of heavy snow, freezing rain and/or sleet that will cause significant disruption to daily activities and travel.

Heavy Snow Watch
Issued by local National Weather Service Forecast offices for individual counties when a pure snow storm producing a seven inch or greater snowfall is POSSIBLE in 12 to 36 hours. (Local criteria)

Heavy Snow Warning
Issued by local National Weather Service Forecast offices for individual counties when a pure snow storm is EXPECTED to produce a seven inch or greater snowfall in a twelve hour time period or a nine inch or greater snowfall in a twenty four hour time period. (Local criteria)

Blizzard Watch
Issued by local National Weather Service Forecast offices for individual counties when a major winter storm producing sustained winds or frequent gusts of 35 mph or greater, considerable falling and/or blowing snow reducing visibility frequently to 1/4 mile or less for a period of three hours or more is POSSIBLE within 12 to 36 hours. . There are no temperature criteria in the definition of a blizzard but freezing temperatures and 35 mph winds will create sub-zero wind chills.

Blizzard Warning
Issued by local National Weather Service Forecast offices for individual counties when a major winter storm producing sustained winds or frequent gusts of 35 mph or greater, considerable falling and/or blowing snow reducing visibility frequently to 1/4 mile or less for a period of three hours or more is IMMINENT or OCCURRING. (Note: there are no temperature criteria in the definition of a blizzard but freezing temperatures and 35 mph winds will create sub-zero wind chills producing particularly severe conditions.)

Freezing Rain/Drizzle Advisory
Issued by local National Weather Service Forecast offices for individual counties when freezing rain or drizzle is expected to occur with ice accretions of less than 1/2". (Only the anticipation of a trace of freezing rain or freezing drizzle is sufficient for the issuance of this advisory as only a slight glazing can cause dangerous travel conditions.)

Ice Storm Warning
Issued by local National Weather Service Forecast offices for individual counties when a significant period of freezing rain is EXPECTED or OCCURRING resulting in ice accretions of 1/2" or greater . Ice storms rank as potentially winter's most destructive and deadly storms resulting in extensive damage to trees and utilities resulting in widespread long duration power outages.

Snow Advisory
Issued by local National Weather Service Forecast offices for individual counties when a light to moderate snow storm is expected to produce a general snow accumulation of 4"-6" in a twelve hour time period. This amount of snow is sufficient to cause an inconvenience to activities and travel.

Winter Weather Advisory
Issued by local National Weather Service Forecast offices for individual counties when a combination of winter precipitation types (snow, sleet and/or freezing rain) are expected to cause significant inconvenience and may be hazardous.